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Have Scientists Finally Found the Higgs Boson?

higgs boson

After almost 50 years of searching, scientists at the CERN research center have announced that they have discovered a Higgs-like particle. This new elementary particle, confirmed as the Higgs boson by an estimate of 99.999%, is known in the Standard Model of Particle Physics for giving particles of all kinds mass. The Standard Model does not only explain the masses of elementary particles but also, the interactions and forces of all the mass in the universe, from galaxies and planets to moons and meteors.

Scientists made this historic announcement after analyzing data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).The LHC is an enormous particle accelerator that spans the borders of Switzerland and France, descending more than 300 feet underground. Thousands of physicists from around the world conduct experiments at the LHC. They send beams of high energy particles to collide at each other, as energy from these collisions travels in opposite directions.

These high energy interactions give data all the way back to the Big Bang. Scientists have sent trillions of proton streams, traveling in opposite directions, down 27 kilometers of the tunnel. These collisions happen billions of times per second, at 99.9999% the speed of light. What they found, after examining these collisions with 3,000 computers is that there is a Higgs-like particle with a mass of 125-126 Giga-electron-volts (GeV). This energy level shows the heaviest boson particle ever found at 5 Sigma, which means the chances for this observation were 1 in 3.5 million. These results came from collaborative experiments done by ATLAS and CMS. Rolf Heuer, the director general of CERN, said about the findings in a recent press release:

“The discovery of a particle consistent with the Higgs boson opens the way to more detailed studies, requiring larger statistics, which will pin down the new particle’s properties, and is likely to shed light on other mysteries of our universe.” Some of these mysteries might include how the universe may have originated from “nothing,” at the time of the Big Bang, if a theory of quantum gravity is further established, according to

This energy level shows the heaviest boson particle ever found at 5 Sigma, which means the chances for this observation were 1 in 3.5 million. These results came from collaborative experiments done by ATLAS and CMS. Rolf Heuer, the director general of CERN, said about the findings in a recent press release: “The discovery of a particle consistent with the Higgs boson opens the way to more detailed studies, requiring larger statistics, which will pin down the new particle’s properties, and is likely to shed light on other mysteries of our universe.” Some of these mysteries might include how the universe may have originated from “nothing,” at the time of the Big Bang, if a theory of quantum gravity is further established, according to physicist, Lawrence Krauss, in his book, “A Universe from Nothing.”

At this moment, the Higgs-like particle fills up a huge gap in the Standard Model. It shows how some particles have mass and how others do not. Beginning with the theoretical professor, Peter Higgs, it was theorized that particles have mass because they pass through the three-dimensional Higgs Field, which is spread throughout the entire universe. Some particles pass more easily in the field while others only trudge along.

The harder it is for a particle to interact with the field, the more massive it is, while the easier it interacts with the field, the less massive it is. When a particle does not interact with the field, like in the case of a photon or light particle, then it is massless. But the particles that interact with the field interact with other particles too. The Higgs boson mediates the interactions of particles that pass through the Higgs field, while the Higgs boson itself is an excitation from the field.

Physicists have searched for data of the Higgs field by observing energy fluctuations of the Higgs boson or Higgs-like particle with other particles. These energetic traces, when a Higgs-like particle decays into other sub-atomic particles, give evidence to a central part of particle physics, and a profound implication for how the universe may have originated.

Michio Kaku, a theoretical physicist, and bestselling author said at CNN, “This particle was the fuse that set off the explosion that created the universe. We think that originally the universe was a gas with no particles at all. Think of a crystal, a beautiful crystal, totally symmetrical, but useless. It exploded. The shattering of this crystal gave us all the masses of the particles we have today: the electron, the proton, the neutron, the atom… All of this from an explosion triggered by a Higgs-like particle.” The results of the Higgs-like particle are preliminary, but they are hard not to be excited over. Scientists have evidence of

All of this from an explosion triggered by a Higgs-like particle.” The results of the Higgs-like particle are preliminary, but they are hard not to be excited over. Scientists have evidence of a mass in the universe and have solidified the union between the electromagnetic and weak forces. This discovery has given insight into the workings of the cosmos, and this is only the beginning of a new epoch of discovery.

Everything you need to know about the Higgs Boson in under 4 minutes

 

Updated: September 7, 2017 — 10:21 am

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